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Kitchen Queries

Welcome to Kitchen Queries, where the nigella.com team will answer your cooking or food related questions.  We’d love you to submit some of your recipe problems, dilemmas or queries for us to get our teeth into!

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Latest Queries

  • Are Bundt Tins Mandatory for Some Cake Recipes?

    I am wondering if it is possible to bake some bundt cake recipes in normat cake tins as I don't have a bundt tin but I am eager to get into the Maple Pecan cake and other recipes such as Easy Almond cake. I was wondering whether I can use a normal springform cake tin? Do I bake the cake for longer? And are there other adjustments to take in mind? I fear the centre will not cook or there's some secret to these 'bundt recipes' that I'm not privy to. I am rather attached to my loaf tin and I realise when a recipe specifies a certain cake tin, there's usually a reason why, so I dare not simply bake it in one.

    From the nigella team:

    Unfortunately to be able to switch from a bundt tin (pan) to a round one it really depends on the individual recipe as some will convert well and some won't. Bundt tins are usually 10 to 12 cup capacity (approximately 2.5 to 3 litres) and this would equate to using two round 20cm (8-inch) or 23cm (9-inch) sandwich-type cake tins. Using just one 23cm (9-inch) round springform tin would run the risk of the inside of the cake being undercooked, especially as a bundt tin shape allows hot air to circulate through the centre of the cake, helping it to bake evenly.

    We would not recommend trying to bake bundt cakes with a central filling, such as the Maple Pecan Bundt Cake in Kitchen (p239), in a round cake tin as the filling will probably spread out too much in a normal tin. However plainer cakes, such as the Spruced Up Vanilla Cake in Christmas (p198), should bake in two 23cm (9-inch) round cake tins though we would suggest using tins with fixed bases as the batter is slightly liquid (baking time is likely to be around 25 minutes). For the Easy Almond Cake in Domestic Goddess (p6) the cake itself is quite thin so we suspect that in this instance it could be baked in a 23cm (9-inch) round springform tin.

    A bunt tin is a useful cake tin to have as the shape of the tin makes it an attractive "plain" cake and dispenses with the fuss of having to decorate a cake. Nordic Ware are the most popularmanufacturer and have a wide range of shapes which are available internationally. If you do buy a bundt tin then always grease it well with oil or melted butter, using a pastry brush to make sure that all of the crevices are well-lubricated. Dusting with a little flour (or cocoa if it is a chocolate cake) after greasing can also help the cooked cake to release easily. American baking sprays are also great for greasing the irregular edges of a bundt tin. 

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