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Yellow Split Pea and Frankfurter Soup

by . Featured in FEAST
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Introduction

The grainy liquid is hearty on its own, but the frankfurters make this a real meal and a half.

The grainy liquid is hearty on its own, but the frankfurters make this a real meal and a half.

Yellow Split Pea and Frankfurter Soup
Photo by James Merrell

Ingredients

Serves: 6-8

Metric Cups
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 - 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon ground mace
  • 500 grams yellow split peas
  • 1½ litres chicken stock (or vegetable stock)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • approx. 8 frankfurter sausages
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 - 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon ground mace
  • 2¼ cups yellow split peas
  • 5½ cups chicken broth (or vegetable stock)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • approx. 8 frankfurter sausages

Method

  1. Peel the onion, carrot and garlic and cut the onion and carrot into rough chunks. Put them all, along with the roughly cut up stick of celery into the bowl of a food processor. Blitz till all are finely chopped.
  2. Spoon the oil into a heavy-based wide saucepan and put on medium heat.
  3. When warm, add the chopped vegetables from the processor and cook for 5-10 minutes, until soft but not coloured.
  4. Add the ground mace - this may be a small amount but it's crucial to the taste - give a good stir and then add the split peas and stir again till they're glossily mixed with the oil-slicked, cooked-down vegetables. Pour over 1.25 litres / 5 cups stock and add the bay leaves, then bring to the boil. Cover, turn down the heat and cook for about an hour until everything is tender and sludgy, adding more stock as needed. Sometimes the peas seem to thicken too much before they actually cook and need to be watered down. Taste for seasoning once everything's ready.
  5. You can add the frankfurters as you wish. It's probably easiest just to cut them into slices - I tend to add them in chunks of about 3cm / 1 inch each - and throw them into the soup to warm, but I just put them into the microwave (40 seconds on high is about right for one or two franks; fiddle about with times when there are more), then slice them hot and add them to each person's bowl as they come. Not an elegant soup, I'll admit, but a near-perfect one.
  1. Peel the onion, carrot and garlic and cut the onion and carrot into rough chunks. Put them all, along with the roughly cut up stick of celery into the bowl of a food processor. Blitz till all are finely chopped.
  2. Spoon the oil into a heavy-based wide saucepan and put on medium heat.
  3. When warm, add the chopped vegetables from the processor and cook for 5-10 minutes, until soft but not coloured.
  4. Add the ground mace - this may be a small amount but it's crucial to the taste - give a good stir and then add the split peas and stir again till they're glossily mixed with the oil-slicked, cooked-down vegetables. Pour over 1.25 litres / 5 cups stock and add the bay leaves, then bring to the boil. Cover, turn down the heat and cook for about an hour until everything is tender and sludgy, adding more stock as needed. Sometimes the peas seem to thicken too much before they actually cook and need to be watered down. Taste for seasoning once everything's ready.
  5. You can add the frankfurters as you wish. It's probably easiest just to cut them into slices - I tend to add them in chunks of about 3cm / 1 inch each - and throw them into the soup to warm, but I just put them into the microwave (40 seconds on high is about right for one or two franks; fiddle about with times when there are more), then slice them hot and add them to each person's bowl as they come. Not an elegant soup, I'll admit, but a near-perfect one.

Additional Information

As ever, when I signal stock, I don't mean you have to start boiling up chickens or whatever. I use some concentrated broth that comes in little bottles and mix it with water as indicated on the label.

As ever, when I signal stock, I don't mean you have to start boiling up chickens or whatever. I use some concentrated broth that comes in little bottles and mix it with water as indicated on the label.

Tell us what you think

What 5 Others have said

  • I have made this soup every New Year's Day since I received the cookbook as a Christmas gift years ago. It is delicious whether we "need" it or not. I also make it throughout the year as we crave it. It is a great use for those left over hot dogs that are grilled and not eaten up at a picnic. Delicious!

    Posted by Mama H on 1st January 2016
  • I'd been eying up this recipe for a few years as it looked so comforting on horrible cold days. I finally came across the yellow split peas in the health food shop and made it today. This really didn't disappoint. It was proper 'stick-to-your-ribs' food. I opted to heat the sausages up in the soup, that way their flavour gets into the broth a bit which is nice. Trouble is the remainder is calling out to me to be eaten.

    Posted by richardbunn on 28th November 2013
  • And it gets ready super quick in a Dutch oven. That domed lid. 15 mins!

    Posted by lvquer on 13th April 2013
  • I'm making this now. It reminds me of the Schützenfest at Detmold, in Germany. They just drop a whole Frankfurter into a bowl of the soup and serve. Delicious!

    Posted by lambtonbookworm on 2nd March 2013
  • Lovely, lovely dish - perfect after a cold day outside! Very hearty and warming. Reminded me of being at a Christmas Markt in Germany and warming up! Like the frankfurters but bratwurst may make an interesting variation. Thanks for bringing back some great memories!

    Posted by mkvaughn on 7th November 2012
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