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Christbrot - Christmas Bread with Dried Fruit

by , featured in Advent: Festive German Bakes to Celebrate the Coming of Christmas
Published by Quadrille
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Introduction

Christbrot is very similar to a Weihnachtsstollen, but lighter in texture, and is best eaten freshly baked without needing time to mature. This is one of the reasons why a Christbrot is more popular to bake at home than a Stollen each year. It isn’t hard to make Christbrot but the method involves a triple rise, so you’ll need to set a morning or afternoon aside if you choose to make it.

Christbrot is very similar to a Weihnachtsstollen, but lighter in texture, and is best eaten freshly baked without needing time to mature. This is one of the reasons why a Christbrot is more popular to bake at home than a Stollen each year. It isn’t hard to make Christbrot but the method involves a triple rise, so you’ll need to set a morning or afternoon aside if you choose to make it.

Ingredients

Makes: 1 loaf (serves about 6)

Metric Cups
  • 75 grams mixed peel
  • 50 grams raisins
  • 50 grams currants
  • 1 tablespoon dark rum
  • 300 grams plain flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 40 grams caster sugar
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • finely grated zest of ½ lemons
  • finely grated zest of ½ oranges
  • 50 grams unsalted butter (melted)
  • 1 egg
  • 18 grams fresh yeast (or 9g (¹⁄₃oz) dried)
  • 70 millilitres tepid full fat milk
  • 50 grams flaked almonds (slivered)

TO COAT

  • 50 grams unsalted butter (melted)
  • 40 grams vanilla sugar (see Additional Info below)
  • 40 grams icing sugar
  • 2½ ounces mixed peel
  • 1¾ ounces raisins
  • 1¾ ounces currants
  • 1 tablespoon dark rum
  • 2¼ cups all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 3½ tablespoons superfine sugar
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • finely grated zest of ½ lemons
  • finely grated zest of ½ oranges
  • 3½ tablespoons unsalted butter (melted)
  • 1 egg
  • ⅔ ounce fresh yeast (or 9g (¹⁄₃oz) dried)
  • ⅓ cup minus 2 teaspoons tepid whole milk
  • 1¾ ounces sliced almonds (slivered)

TO COAT

  • 3½ tablespoons unsalted butter (melted)
  • 3½ tablespoons vanilla sugar (see Additional Info below)
  • 4½ tablespoons confectioners' sugar

Method

Christbrot - Christmas Bread with Dried Fruit is a guest recipe by Anja Dunk so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe

  1. Put the mixed peel, raisins and currants into a bowl, pour over the rum and set aside to infuse while you prepare the dough.
  2. Put the flour, sugar, salt and citrus zests into a large bowl and mix together with a wooden spoon, then add the melted butter and egg.
  3. Crumble the yeast (or sprinkle if using dried) into the tepid milk and stir to dissolve. Pour the yeasted milk into the flour mixture and, using your hands, bring the ingredients together into a rough dough. Tip the dough onto a floured surface and knead for about 10 minutes until it becomes more elastic.
  4. Form it into a ball and nestle it into the bottom of the bowl. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and set aside in a warm spot to rise for 1–3 hours until almost doubled in size. (Alternatively put the flour, sugar, salt and citrus zests into the bowl of a free-standing electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the butter and egg. Pour in the yeasted milk and knead for 5 minutes until the dough is elastic. Cover the bowl and set aside, as above.)
  5. Knock the dough back with your fist and add the almonds and boozy dried fruit (along with any liquid). Knead the fruit and nuts through for a few minutes until evenly incorporated. Form the dough into a ball and return it to the bowl. Cover with the tea towel and set aside in a warm spot for about 20 minutes for a short second rise.
  6. Form the dough into a round loaf shape and place it on a baking sheet lined with non-stick baking parchment. Cover with a tea towel and leave somewhere warm to rise for a final 30 minutes.
  7. Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/375°F.
  8. Bake in the oven for 35–40 minutes until brown all over and cooked through, checking after 25 minutes; if it is getting too brown cover it with a piece of foil for the remainder of the baking time
  9. Transfer to a wire rack and brush with the melted butter repeatedly until all the butter is used up. Sprinkle with the vanilla sugar, then sift over the icing sugar.
  10. This is best eaten within a couple of hours after it’s baked. Or you can wrap it in foil and store in an airtight tin; it will keep for up to 3 days, after which it is still fine to toast for a further 2 days.
  1. Put the mixed peel, raisins and currants into a bowl, pour over the rum and set aside to infuse while you prepare the dough.
  2. Put the flour, sugar, salt and citrus zests into a large bowl and mix together with a wooden spoon, then add the melted butter and egg.
  3. Crumble the yeast (or sprinkle if using dried) into the tepid milk and stir to dissolve. Pour the yeasted milk into the flour mixture and, using your hands, bring the ingredients together into a rough dough. Tip the dough onto a floured surface and knead for about 10 minutes until it becomes more elastic.
  4. Form it into a ball and nestle it into the bottom of the bowl. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and set aside in a warm spot to rise for 1–3 hours until almost doubled in size. (Alternatively put the flour, sugar, salt and citrus zests into the bowl of a free-standing electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the butter and egg. Pour in the yeasted milk and knead for 5 minutes until the dough is elastic. Cover the bowl and set aside, as above.)
  5. Knock the dough back with your fist and add the almonds and boozy dried fruit (along with any liquid). Knead the fruit and nuts through for a few minutes until evenly incorporated. Form the dough into a ball and return it to the bowl. Cover with the tea towel and set aside in a warm spot for about 20 minutes for a short second rise.
  6. Form the dough into a round loaf shape and place it on a baking sheet lined with non-stick baking parchment. Cover with a tea towel and leave somewhere warm to rise for a final 30 minutes.
  7. Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/375°F.
  8. Bake in the oven for 35–40 minutes until brown all over and cooked through, checking after 25 minutes; if it is getting too brown cover it with a piece of foil for the remainder of the baking time
  9. Transfer to a wire rack and brush with the melted butter repeatedly until all the butter is used up. Sprinkle with the vanilla sugar, then sift over the confectioners' sugar.
  10. This is best eaten within a couple of hours after it’s baked. Or you can wrap it in foil and store in an airtight tin; it will keep for up to 3 days, after which it is still fine to toast for a further 2 days.

Additional Information

VANILLA SUGAR
This is a popular baking ingredient in Germany and is sold in little sachets alongside baking powder in the shops. You can buy it online outside Germany.

VANILLA SUGAR
This is a popular baking ingredient in Germany and is sold in little sachets alongside baking powder in the shops. You can buy it online outside Germany.

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