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Semi-Hard Cheese Like Asiago

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

The procedure I have not invented it but I just applied the product specification.

The procedure I have not invented it but I just applied the product specification.

Ingredients

Serves: 4-6

Metric Cups

For the Cheese

  • 5½ litres milk (fresh)
  • 1 tub yoghurt (without sugar, which contains the entire yeast streptococcus thermophilus and lactobacillus bulgaricus)
  • 2 millilitres rennet (with title 1:10000)
  • 15 grams salt

For the Brine

  • 180 grams salt (per litre of water, at 15-20 degrees celsius)

For the Cheese

  • 9⅔ pints milk (fresh)
  • 1 tub yoghurt (without sugar, which contains the entire yeast streptococcus thermophilus and lactobacillus bulgaricus)
  • fluid ounce rennet (with title 1:10000)
  • 1 ounce salt

For the Brine

  • 6 ounces salt (per litre of water, at 15-20 degrees celsius)

Method

Semi-Hard Cheese Like Asiago is a community recipe submitted by zoagli81 and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • Dissolve the yogurt in the milk and leave at room temperature for 3 hours.
  • Slowly warm stirring the pot to have no zones at different temperatures. It should reach about 36 ° -37 °. I recommend turning off the gas when the temperature is around 34 ° -35 ° because then thermal inertia tends to make the temperature rise.
  • Aspirate with a syringe and add the rennet to the milk, stirring well with a whisk for about 40 seconds, then cover and let stand for 40 minutes wrapped in a blanket. During this period of time do not open, do not jiggle the pan, do not remove the blanket, don't even look at it .....
  • After 40 minutes cut the curd into 4x4cm cubes with a knife blade which is long enough to get to the bottom of the pot. Let this stand for 15 minutes, then whisk the curd in order to reduce it to the size of a walnut or hazelnut. At this point turn the heat on very low, taking the mass at a temperature of about 42-43 ° however not more than 45 °. During this re-heating the pulp sinks and the whey is filtered back. The cooking should last 15-20 minutes, then drain curd into a cloth, making sure that the serum is gathered in a pot.
  • Once dried, transfer the curd into a bowl and add 15 g of salt, and mix well but gently so as not to fragment the curd. Once mixed put it into the molds, (unfortunately I do not have a picture of this.....) and press well with your hands and then weights. I used a steel weight of about 6-7 kg. The pressing should take 4 to 6 hours in a damp but cool room. I put it in a basement inside a sort of cage in which my father makes seasoned hams, together with a pot of hot water, but not hot enough to raise the temperature, all covered with nylon to make a little greenhouse .....
  • After the pressing, the cheese should be nice and compact. Keep it fresh and moist for 3 days on a grate so that it dries very well, making sure to shoot it every day. After this time you make the second cured in brine bath for about 1 hour and a half, turning the form in about 40 minutes.
  • Now the form has to rest for 20-30 days in a damp, cool place. Turn periodically and grease the surface with an emulsion of vegetable oil and white vinegar.
  • Dissolve the yogurt in the milk and leave at room temperature for 3 hours.
  • Slowly warm stirring the pot to have no zones at different temperatures. It should reach about 36 ° -37 °. I recommend turning off the gas when the temperature is around 34 ° -35 ° because then thermal inertia tends to make the temperature rise.
  • Aspirate with a syringe and add the rennet to the milk, stirring well with a whisk for about 40 seconds, then cover and let stand for 40 minutes wrapped in a blanket. During this period of time do not open, do not jiggle the pan, do not remove the blanket, don't even look at it .....
  • After 40 minutes cut the curd into 4x4cm cubes with a knife blade which is long enough to get to the bottom of the pot. Let this stand for 15 minutes, then whisk the curd in order to reduce it to the size of a walnut or hazelnut. At this point turn the heat on very low, taking the mass at a temperature of about 42-43 ° however not more than 45 °. During this re-heating the pulp sinks and the whey is filtered back. The cooking should last 15-20 minutes, then drain curd into a cloth, making sure that the serum is gathered in a pot.
  • Once dried, transfer the curd into a bowl and add 15 g of salt, and mix well but gently so as not to fragment the curd. Once mixed put it into the molds, (unfortunately I do not have a picture of this.....) and press well with your hands and then weights. I used a steel weight of about 6-7 kg. The pressing should take 4 to 6 hours in a damp but cool room. I put it in a basement inside a sort of cage in which my father makes seasoned hams, together with a pot of hot water, but not hot enough to raise the temperature, all covered with nylon to make a little greenhouse .....
  • After the pressing, the cheese should be nice and compact. Keep it fresh and moist for 3 days on a grate so that it dries very well, making sure to shoot it every day. After this time you make the second cured in brine bath for about 1 hour and a half, turning the form in about 40 minutes.
  • Now the form has to rest for 20-30 days in a damp, cool place. Turn periodically and grease the surface with an emulsion of vegetable oil and white vinegar.
  • Additional Information

    With serum advanced I made the ricotta following the recipes that I found here. Although the photos do not show that well, looking at a slice closely you can see that it is beginning to form holes typical of asiago.

    With serum advanced I made the ricotta following the recipes that I found here. Although the photos do not show that well, looking at a slice closely you can see that it is beginning to form holes typical of asiago.

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