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Scotch Pancakes

by . Featured in FEAST
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Introduction

When I was a child, we often had Scotch pancakes (out of a packet) when we got home from school. And the thing - for those of you who don't know - about Scotch pancakes is that they are not eaten like pancakes - hot with syrup and a knife and fork - but like toast, spread with butter and jam. I always remember them being on the cold side of lukewarm, but I think warm, though not so hot as to burn your fingers, is what you're aiming for.

When I was a child, we often had Scotch pancakes (out of a packet) when we got home from school. And the thing - for those of you who don't know - about Scotch pancakes is that they are not eaten like pancakes - hot with syrup and a knife and fork - but like toast, spread with butter and jam. I always remember them being on the cold side of lukewarm, but I think warm, though not so hot as to burn your fingers, is what you're aiming for.

Scotch Pancakes
Photo by James Merrell

Ingredients

Makes: approx. 20 pancakes

Metric Cups
  • ½ teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • 150 millilitres milk
  • 110 grams plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon golden syrup
  • ½ teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • ⅔ cup milk
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon golden syrup or light corn syrup

Method

  1. Put the vinegar into the (preferably room temperature) milk and set aside while you measure out the other ingredients.
  2. Put the flour into a wide-necked jug or bowl and add the bicarbonate of soda.
  3. In another jug or bowl add the egg, oil, and then with the oily spoon measure the syrup in and whisk everything together.
  4. Add the vinegary milk, and then add the jug of wet ingredients to the dry, whisking to a batter.
  5. Heat a flat griddle or heavy non-stick pan with no oil. Add 1½ tablespoons of batter to make each Scotch pancake, and then when bubbles appear flip them over to make them golden brown on either side.
  1. Put the vinegar into the (preferably room temperature) milk and set aside while you measure out the other ingredients.
  2. Put the flour into a wide-necked jug or bowl and add the baking soda.
  3. In another jug or bowl add the egg, oil, and then with the oily spoon measure the syrup in and whisk everything together.
  4. Add the vinegary milk, and then add the jug of wet ingredients to the dry, whisking to a batter.
  5. Heat a flat griddle or heavy non-stick pan with no oil. Add 1½ tablespoons of batter to make each Scotch pancake, and then when bubbles appear flip them over to make them golden brown on either side.

Tell us what you think

What 11 Others have said

  • Pikelets are English and they are called crumpets it all depends on what part of Britain you come from.

    Posted by sid442 on 9th May 2016
  • Pikelets in Australia too. What a strange name... Would love to know where that came from. Great for afternoon tea!

    Posted by Maidy on 28th April 2016
  • Scotch pancakes are nothing like crumpets or pikelets (a thinner version of a crumpet), crumpets have strong flour & yeast in them....the texture, taste and appearance are completely different. My mum was Scottish so I know them as drop scones. We'd have them buttered with a nice hot cup of tea or, we'd have them toasted with a cooked breakfast instead of potato cakes.......when we were on holiday at my Gran's we'd have Lorne sausage too (square skinless sausage). ......mmmmm!

    Posted by Wiggleywoo on 3rd July 2015
  • Can you freeze these lovely pancakes?

    Posted by ermjane on 22nd February 2012
  • Love this recipe..easy,tasty..and as always, when I turn to Nigella for help, as succes :-)

    Posted by Yinna on 9th February 2014
  • My late mum taught me to make these when I was about eight years old - without the wine vinegar and syrup. We always called them "drop scones", but then she and her side of the family were scots, so Scotch Pancakes would have a different meaning - scotch being an alcoholic drink and the water of life!

    Posted by RingoDave on 12th February 2013
  • I love these scotch pancakes or dropped scones my MIL calls them pikelets she's Welsh......

    Posted by lindy21 on 12th February 2013
  • If you don't like rubbery scotch pancakes then try to avoid beating the mix. Try folding the wet ingredients into the dry using a spatula. In Scotland we call them "Drop-scones" ("scone" rhyming with "gone" not with "cone").

    Posted by kelvinbridge on 15th April 2012
  • In South Africa we call them crumpets. I can eat them by the dozen....

    Posted by grieta on 17th October 2011
  • In the Netherlands they are called poffertjes. We eat them at de fair when it is in town. There is allways a stand where they bake them on a huge grill.

    Posted by chantal15 on 17th October 2011
  • In New Zealand we call them pikelets - not sure where the name comes from because I called them Scotch pancakes in the UK. Don't buy them in a packet - they are so easy to make. Place on a wire tray as they come out of the pan and cover with a clean tea towel until you are ready to put on the butter/jam/cream etc. Enjoy!

    Posted by BB on 15th July 2011
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