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Calvados Syllabub

by . Featured in HOW TO BE A DOMESTIC GODDESS
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Introduction

Syllabub is one of those ethereal, dreamy confections which seem at odds with the description 'pudding'. But this scented, whipped cream, piled up to swell cloudily out of its container, is a perfect way to end dinner and gloriously easy to boot.

Syllabub is one of those ethereal, dreamy confections which seem at odds with the description 'pudding'. But this scented, whipped cream, piled up to swell cloudily out of its container, is a perfect way to end dinner and gloriously easy to boot.

Calvados Syllabub
Photo by Petrina Tinslay

Ingredients

Serves: 4

Metric Cups
  • 8 tablespoons dry cider
  • 2 tablespoons calvados
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons caster sugar
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 300 millilitres double cream
  • 4 cinnamon sticks
  • ½ cup dry hard cider
  • 2 tablespoons calvados
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup superfine sugar
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1¼ cups heavy cream
  • 4 cinnamon sticks

Method

You will need 4 x 150ml / 6oz glasses.

  1. Whip the cream to soft peaks in a freestanding mixer. If you haven't got one, don't worry - but I would then advise a hand-held electric mixer.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine the cider, Calvados, ground cinnamon, lemon juice and sugar. Then gradually beat this mixture into your whipped cream, and keep whisking until you have a creamy mixture that's light and airy but able to form soft peaks. I always think of syllabub as occupying some notional territory between solid and liquid; you're aiming, as you whisk, for what Jane Grigson called "bulky whiteness" - so be careful not to let the cream become too thick or, indeed, to go further and curdle.
  3. Spoon the syllabub into the glasses (and those you see here were bought by my maternal grandparents on their honeymoon in Venice) and puncture each semi-solid mound with a cinnamon stick, just as a Flake is plunged into a scoop of ice cream. If that's just a little too frou-frou for you (and I quite understand), simply dust the uneven tops with the merest haze of ground cinnamon.

You will need 4 x 150ml / 6oz glasses.

  1. Whip the cream to soft peaks in a freestanding mixer. If you haven't got one, don't worry - but I would then advise a hand-held electric mixer.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine the cider, Calvados, ground cinnamon, lemon juice and sugar. Then gradually beat this mixture into your whipped cream, and keep whisking until you have a creamy mixture that's light and airy but able to form soft peaks. I always think of syllabub as occupying some notional territory between solid and liquid; you're aiming, as you whisk, for what Jane Grigson called "bulky whiteness" - so be careful not to let the cream become too thick or, indeed, to go further and curdle.
  3. Spoon the syllabub into the glasses (and those you see here were bought by my maternal grandparents on their honeymoon in Venice) and puncture each semi-solid mound with a cinnamon stick, just as a Flake is plunged into a scoop of ice cream. If that's just a little too frou-frou for you (and I quite understand), simply dust the uneven tops with the merest haze of ground cinnamon.

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What 1 Other has said

  • I have made this dessert many times and my guests love it.

    Posted by wine1705 on 5th August 2011
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