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Drunken Noodles

by . Featured in SIMPLY NIGELLA
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Introduction

The general explanation given why Thai drunken noodles are so called is that they have enough chilli in them to shake you out of even the worst hangover. This is my simplified version. I've cut to the chase - no meat, fish or veg, just highly seasoned, searingly hot noodles.

Most of the ingredients come from the storecupboard, and the finished dish is in front of you in 10 minutes. I find these hot noodles hard to beat, and they do really blow your head off: if you want less of a fiery fright, then halve the chilli flakes. To start with, at least...

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

The general explanation given why Thai drunken noodles are so called is that they have enough chilli in them to shake you out of even the worst hangover. This is my simplified version. I've cut to the chase - no meat, fish or veg, just highly seasoned, searingly hot noodles.

Most of the ingredients come from the storecupboard, and the finished dish is in front of you in 10 minutes. I find these hot noodles hard to beat, and they do really blow your head off: if you want less of a fiery fright, then halve the chilli flakes. To start with, at least...

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

Image of Nigella's Drunken Noodles
Photo by Keiko Oikawa

Ingredients

Serves: 2 or a very drink-soaked or greedy 1

Metric Cups
  • 150 grams dried flat rice noodles (the pad thai sort)
  • 2 x 15ml tablespoons cold water
  • 1 x 15ml tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons sunflower oil
  • 1 x 3 centimetres piece of fresh ginger (peeled and finely grated)
  • 1 clove garlic (peeled and finely grated or minced)
  • 1 lime (preferably unwaxed)
  • ½ teaspoon dried chilli flakes
  • 4 x 15ml tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 handful chopped fresh coriander
  • 6 ounces dried flat rice noodles (the pad thai sort)
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted Asian sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 x 1 inch piece of fresh gingerroot (peeled and finely grated)
  • 1 clove garlic (peeled and finely grated or minced)
  • 1 lime (preferably unwaxed)
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 1 handful chopped cilantro

Method

  1. Soak the rice noodles in hot water for 8 minutes, or according to packet instructions, then drain and refresh under a cold running tap.
  2. Put the 2 tablespoons of water into a cup and stir in the oyster sauce, then set aside for a mo.
  3. Put the oils in a wok, turn on the heat and add the ginger, garlic and grate in the zest of the lime - I use a coarse microplane grater here, only because it's faster than a fine one. Sprinkle in the chilli flakes. Stir well, then tip in the soaked, drained rice noodles and stir them - I find this easier with an implement in each hand - quickly in the hotly seasoned oil.
  4. Add the watered-down oyster sauce, the juice of ½ the lime and the soy sauce, then transfer to a waiting bowl (or bowls) and toss with the chopped coriander. Keep the bottle of soy sauce and the remaining ½ lime close at hand, should you need either of them as you eat. I am such a pyrophile, I like to keep some extra chilli flakes to hand, too.
  1. Soak the rice noodles in hot water for 8 minutes, or according to packet instructions, then drain and refresh under a cold running tap.
  2. Put the 2 tablespoons of water into a cup and stir in the oyster sauce, then set aside for a mo.
  3. Put the oils in a wok, turn on the heat and add the ginger, garlic and grate in the zest of the lime - I use a coarse microplane grater here, only because it's faster than a fine one. Sprinkle in the chilli flakes. Stir well, then tip in the soaked, drained rice noodles and stir them - I find this easier with an implement in each hand - quickly in the hotly seasoned oil.
  4. Add the watered-down oyster sauce, the juice of ½ the lime and the soy sauce, then transfer to a waiting bowl (or bowls) and toss with the chopped coriander. Keep the bottle of soy sauce and the remaining ½ lime close at hand, should you need either of them as you eat. I am such a pyrophile, I like to keep some extra chilli flakes to hand, too.

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