youtube pinterest twitter facebook instagram vimeo Bookmark Entries BURGER NEW Chevron Down Chevron Left Chevron Right Basket Speech Comment Search Video Play Icon Premium Nigella Lawson Vegan Vegetarian Member Speech Recipe Bookmark Comment Camera Scales Quantity List Reorder Remove Open book
Menu Signed In
More Nigella recipes

Gin and Tonic Jelly

by . Featured in HOW TO BE A DOMESTIC GODDESS
Print me

Introduction

This is so far from being the sort of jelly you'd expect at a children's party as can be imagined! The white currant decoration may be unavailable, but what matters is the drink-made-dessert itself!

If you are unable to find gelatine leaves, you can use powdered gelatine instead. For the UK we recommend 6 teaspoons unflavoured powdered gelatine and for the US 5½ teaspoons unflavored powdered gelatin. At step 2, put 5 tablespoons cold water in a small bowl and sprinkle over the gelatine. Let it stand for 5 minutes to hydrate - it will swell up and become slightly translucent. At step 2, stir the gelatine into the saucepan of warm liquid, until dissolved. Continue as directed.

This is so far from being the sort of jelly you'd expect at a children's party as can be imagined! The white currant decoration may be unavailable, but what matters is the drink-made-dessert itself!

If you are unable to find gelatine leaves, you can use powdered gelatine instead. For the UK we recommend 6 teaspoons unflavoured powdered gelatine and for the US 5½ teaspoons unflavored powdered gelatin. At step 2, put 5 tablespoons cold water in a small bowl and sprinkle over the gelatine. Let it stand for 5 minutes to hydrate - it will swell up and become slightly translucent. At step 2, stir the gelatine into the saucepan of warm liquid, until dissolved. Continue as directed.

Gin and Tonic Jelly
Photo by Petrina Tinslay

Ingredients

Serves: 8

Metric Cups
  • 300 millilitres water (plus 50ml / 3 tablespoons more)
  • 300 grams caster sugar
  • zest and juice of 2 lemons
  • 400 millilitres tonic water (not slimline)
  • 250 millilitres gin
  • 28 grams gelatine leaves
  • 2 punnets whitecurrants (or 3 - 4 punnets raspberries optional)
  • 1 teaspoon icing sugar (if using raspberries)
  • 1¼ cups water (plus 50ml / 3 tablespoons more)
  • 1½ cups superfine sugar
  • zest and juice of 2 lemons
  • 1⅔ cups tonic water (not slimline)
  • 1 cup gin
  • 1 ounce sheet gelatin (platinum grade)
  • 2 punnets whitecurrants (or 3 - 4 punnets raspberries optional)
  • 1 teaspoon confectioners' sugar (if using raspberries)

Method

You will need a 1¼ litre / 5 cup jelly mould, lightly greased with almond or vegetable oil.

  1. Put the 300ml / 1¼ cups water and the sugar into a wide, thick-bottomed saucepan and bring to the boil. Let boil for 5 minutes, take off the heat, add the lemon zest and leave to steep for 15 minutes. Strain into a measuring jug, then add the lemon juice, the tonic water and the gin; you should have reached the 1,200ml / scant 5 cup mark; if not, add more tonic water, gin or lemon juice to taste.
  2. Soak the gelatine leaves in a dish of cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, warm 250ml / 1 cup of the gin and tonic mixture in a saucepan until hot but not boiling. Take off the heat and let it cool a little, then squeeze out the gelatine leaves and stir them into the warm gin and tonic mixture until dissolved. Then stir this into the remaining gin and tonic mixture in the measuring jug, making sure it is thoroughly dispersed. Pour into the mould and, when cold, put in the fridge to set. This should take about 6 hours.
  3. When you are ready to unmould, half-fill a sink with warm water and stand the jelly mould in it for 30 seconds or so. Clamp a big flat plate over the jelly and invert to unmould, shaking it as you do so. If it doesn't work, stand it in the warm water for another half-minute or so and try again. If you've used a dome mould, surround the jelly with whitecurrants (Sainsbury's sells them in summer, as do many greengrocers'), or fill the hole with them if you've used a ring mould. Raspberries are just as good, but dust these with icing sugar - it sounds poncey, but it makes the pale-jade glimmer of the jelly and the otherwise-too-vibrant red of the fruit come together on the plate. The whitecurrants should be left to glimmer, opal-like, without interference.

You will need a 1¼ litre / 5 cup jelly mould, lightly greased with almond or vegetable oil.

  1. Put the 300ml / 1¼ cups water and the sugar into a wide, thick-bottomed saucepan and bring to the boil. Let boil for 5 minutes, take off the heat, add the lemon zest and leave to steep for 15 minutes. Strain into a measuring jug, then add the lemon juice, the tonic water and the gin; you should have reached the 1,200ml / scant 5 cup mark; if not, add more tonic water, gin or lemon juice to taste.
  2. Soak the sheet gelatin (platinum grade) in a dish of cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, warm 250ml / 1 cup of the gin and tonic mixture in a saucepan until hot but not boiling. Take off the heat and let it cool a little, then squeeze out the sheet gelatin (platinum grade) and stir them into the warm gin and tonic mixture until dissolved. Then stir this into the remaining gin and tonic mixture in the measuring jug, making sure it is thoroughly dispersed. Pour into the mould and, when cold, put in the fridge to set. This should take about 6 hours.
  3. When you are ready to unmould, half-fill a sink with warm water and stand the jelly mould in it for 30 seconds or so. Clamp a big flat plate over the jelly and invert to unmould, shaking it as you do so. If it doesn't work, stand it in the warm water for another half-minute or so and try again. If you've used a dome mould, surround the jelly with whitecurrants (Sainsbury's sells them in summer, as do many greengrocers'), or fill the hole with them if you've used a ring mould. Raspberries are just as good, but dust these with confectioners' sugar - it sounds poncey, but it makes the pale-jade glimmer of the jelly and the otherwise-too-vibrant red of the fruit come together on the plate. The whitecurrants should be left to glimmer, opal-like, without interference.

Additional Information

To make a vodka and lime jelly, simply substitute 6 limes for the 2 lemons and use vodka in place of the gin. I remind you again of the necessity of using leaf gelatine, since it is about a thousand times easier than the powdered sort.

To make a vodka and lime jelly, simply substitute 6 limes for the 2 lemons and use vodka in place of the gin. I remind you again of the necessity of using leaf gelatine, since it is about a thousand times easier than the powdered sort.

Tell us what you think

What 1 Other has said

  • Yum! I made a Gin & Tonic cake recently it was yummy! http://bit.ly/11MDex6

    Posted by stylistontherun on 16th June 2013
Show more comments