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Ginger Pig Venison Bourguignon Pie

by , featured in Ginger Pig Christmas Cookbook
Published by Mitchell Beazley
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Introduction

This is a beautiful and hearty option for a Christmas Eve supper. You can make one large pie (about 21cm/8¼ inches across and 9cm/3½ inches deep), which will serve four; you can make two smaller pies and cook them both; or you can cook one smaller pie and freeze half the filling and half the pastry, both uncooked, to use later. (And thank your past self profusely when you’re eating the saved pie in the depths of dreary January.)

Ginger Pig Christmas Cookbook by Tim Wilson and Rebecca Seal is published by Mitchell Beazley, £25.00, www.octopusbooks.co.uk

This is a beautiful and hearty option for a Christmas Eve supper. You can make one large pie (about 21cm/8¼ inches across and 9cm/3½ inches deep), which will serve four; you can make two smaller pies and cook them both; or you can cook one smaller pie and freeze half the filling and half the pastry, both uncooked, to use later. (And thank your past self profusely when you’re eating the saved pie in the depths of dreary January.)

Ginger Pig Christmas Cookbook by Tim Wilson and Rebecca Seal is published by Mitchell Beazley, £25.00, www.octopusbooks.co.uk

Image of Tim Wilson and Rebecca Seal's Venison Bourgiugnon Pie
Photo by Sam A Harris

Ingredients

Serves: 4

Metric Cups
  • flavourless oil (for frying)
  • 1 kilogram venison shoulder (diced into 3cm (1¼ inch) pieces)
  • 2 onions (chopped)
  • 2 carrots (diced)
  • 400 millilitres beef stock (plus more as needed)
  • 500 millilitres red wine
  • 90 millilitres port
  • 2 tablespoons thyme leaves
  • 100 grams smoked bacon lardons
  • 100 grams chestnut mushrooms (roughly chopped)
  • 1 fat clove of garlic (crushed)
  • 2 tablespoons cornflour
  • 2 - 3 teaspoons redcurrant jelly
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

FOR THE PASTRY

  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 200 millilitres water
  • 500 grams plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 250 grams beef suet
  • flavourless oil (for frying)
  • 2lb 4 ounces venison shoulder (diced into 3cm (1¼ inch) pieces)
  • 2 onions (chopped)
  • 2 carrots (diced)
  • 14 fluid ounces beef broth (plus more as needed)
  • 18 fluid ounces red wine
  • 3 fluid ounces port
  • 2 tablespoons thyme leaves
  • 3½ ounces smoked bacon lardons
  • 3½ ounces cremini mushrooms (roughly chopped)
  • 1 fat clove of garlic (crushed)
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 - 3 teaspoons redcurrant jelly
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

FOR THE PASTRY

  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 7 fluid ounces water
  • 1lb 2 ounces all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 9 ounces beef suet

Method

Ginger Pig Venison Bourguignon Pie is a guest recipe by Tim Wilson and Rebecca Seal so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe

  1. Place a large pan with a lid over a high heat and add a splash of oil. Thoroughly brown the venison all over, turning it regularly and working in batches if necessary. Add the onions to the pan and allow them to soften and begin to brown. Add the carrots, beef stock, red wine, port, thyme and a pinch of salt and pepper. If the meat isn’t covered by the liquid, add a little more stock, or water. Bring up to a simmer, then cover and cook until the venison is tender, which could take up to 3 hours. (You can also do this in the oven, in an ovenproof pan with the lid on, at about 160°C/325°F, gas mark 3, or in a slow cooker set to high.) Check the liquid levels every 45 minutes or so.
  2. Once the meat is tender, add another splash of oil to a frying pan set over a high heat. Sauté the bacon briskly, then when the bacon is browned and the fat is beginning to render out, add the mushrooms to the pan, adding a little more oil as needed. Turn the heat to medium and sauté until the mushrooms are beginning to caramelize. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes.
  3. Return the venison pan to a medium heat on the hob. Add the bacon, garlic and mushrooms to the venison and stir well. Bring the mixture up to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes.
  4. Place the cornflour in a small bowl. Spoon about 2 tablespoonfuls of the cooking liquor into the bowl and stir until the cornflour mixture is smooth. Pour this mixture into the meat pan, stirring the sauce as you do so, and cook for another 5 minutes or so, or until the sauce has thickened. Add the redcurrant jelly and stir well, then taste and adjust the seasoning or add more redcurrant jelly.
  5. When ready to cook, make the pastry. Whisk the egg into the water, then sieve out any lumps. Place the flour, salt and suet into the bowl of a stand mixer and combine, running the beaters on slow. Next, gradually add the water (you might not need all of it), mixing until a soft dough is formed. As soon as it comes together, tip it onto a floured board or clean work surface dusted with flour, and use your hands to bring it into a ball of fairly smooth dough. Don’t overwork the pastry as it may shrink during cooking.
  6. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F), gas mark 4.
  7. Divide the dough into 2 balls. Flour a rolling pin and roll 1 dough ball out to a rough disc about 35cm (14 inches) across and about 4–5mm (¼ inch) thick, if making a large pie. Grease the pie tin with oil, then dust with flour. Drape the pastry over the tin, then gently work it into the corners. Where the pastry overlaps and pleats, pull away the excess and press the joins together smoothly, making sure there are no thick areas of pastry. Allow the pastry to overhang the rim of the tin by 1cm (½ inch), then trim away the excess beyond that. Brush the edge with the beaten egg.
  8. Use a slotted spoon to fill the pie, lifting out the meat and vegetables first. Pour the liquid into the pastry shell last, being sure not to overfill it. You want to be reasonably generous, as if the pie isn’t full the pastry will collapse downwards, but it also shouldn’t be brimming, or the gravy will bubble out during cooking.
  9. Roll out the other piece of pastry to the same thickness. Lie it over the pie and leave a generous 2cm (¾ inch) overhang before trimming off the excess. Pinch the 2 layers together, creating a crimped pattern as you go. Brush the top with beaten egg and decorate with Christmas shapes cut from the pastry trimmings. (If you have a decent-sized ball of pastry left over, freeze it to use as a topper for another pie.)
  10. Place in the hot oven and bake for 50 minutes. When ready, the pie will be golden brown and slightly pulled away from the tin. Remove from the oven and leave for 5 minutes before gently turning out. Serve with some buttered greens.
  1. Place a large pan with a lid over a high heat and add a splash of oil. Thoroughly brown the venison all over, turning it regularly and working in batches if necessary. Add the onions to the pan and allow them to soften and begin to brown. Add the carrots, beef broth, red wine, port, thyme and a pinch of salt and pepper. If the meat isn’t covered by the liquid, add a little more stock, or water. Bring up to a simmer, then cover and cook until the venison is tender, which could take up to 3 hours. (You can also do this in the oven, in an ovenproof pan with the lid on, at about 160°C/325°F, gas mark 3, or in a slow cooker set to high.) Check the liquid levels every 45 minutes or so.
  2. Once the meat is tender, add another splash of oil to a frying pan set over a high heat. Sauté the bacon briskly, then when the bacon is browned and the fat is beginning to render out, add the mushrooms to the pan, adding a little more oil as needed. Turn the heat to medium and sauté until the mushrooms are beginning to caramelize. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes.
  3. Return the venison pan to a medium heat on the hob. Add the bacon, garlic and mushrooms to the venison and stir well. Bring the mixture up to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes.
  4. Place the cornstarch in a small bowl. Spoon about 2 tablespoonfuls of the cooking liquor into the bowl and stir until the cornstarch mixture is smooth. Pour this mixture into the meat pan, stirring the sauce as you do so, and cook for another 5 minutes or so, or until the sauce has thickened. Add the redcurrant jelly and stir well, then taste and adjust the seasoning or add more redcurrant jelly.
  5. When ready to cook, make the pastry. Whisk the egg into the water, then sieve out any lumps. Place the flour, salt and suet into the bowl of a stand mixer and combine, running the beaters on slow. Next, gradually add the water (you might not need all of it), mixing until a soft dough is formed. As soon as it comes together, tip it onto a floured board or clean work surface dusted with flour, and use your hands to bring it into a ball of fairly smooth dough. Don’t overwork the pastry as it may shrink during cooking.
  6. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F), gas mark 4.
  7. Divide the dough into 2 balls. Flour a rolling pin and roll 1 dough ball out to a rough disc about 35cm (14 inches) across and about 4–5mm (¼ inch) thick, if making a large pie. Grease the pie tin with oil, then dust with flour. Drape the pastry over the tin, then gently work it into the corners. Where the pastry overlaps and pleats, pull away the excess and press the joins together smoothly, making sure there are no thick areas of pastry. Allow the pastry to overhang the rim of the tin by 1cm (½ inch), then trim away the excess beyond that. Brush the edge with the beaten egg.
  8. Use a slotted spoon to fill the pie, lifting out the meat and vegetables first. Pour the liquid into the pastry shell last, being sure not to overfill it. You want to be reasonably generous, as if the pie isn’t full the pastry will collapse downwards, but it also shouldn’t be brimming, or the gravy will bubble out during cooking.
  9. Roll out the other piece of pastry to the same thickness. Lie it over the pie and leave a generous 2cm (¾ inch) overhang before trimming off the excess. Pinch the 2 layers together, creating a crimped pattern as you go. Brush the top with beaten egg and decorate with Christmas shapes cut from the pastry trimmings. (If you have a decent-sized ball of pastry left over, freeze it to use as a topper for another pie.)
  10. Place in the hot oven and bake for 50 minutes. When ready, the pie will be golden brown and slightly pulled away from the tin. Remove from the oven and leave for 5 minutes before gently turning out. Serve with some buttered greens.

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