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Goulash Ala Bourguignon

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

This is basically a beef stew somewhere between Boeuf Bourguignon and Goulash. Goulash can come in many forms and varieties, depending on the origin of the recipe, but it is usually spicy and contains paprika and/or tomatoes. This tastes even better the day after it was made, it is stressfree and foolproof. I know the amount of wine may sound odd but the tannic acid in the wine makes the beef become incredibly tender. During cooking the sauce changes colour and the strong wine aroma will be mellow and delicious. Just like Boeuf Bourguignon but more rustic and spicy. I came up with this after I tried my roommates goulash. Smelled heavenly but the beef was stringy and tough.

This is basically a beef stew somewhere between Boeuf Bourguignon and Goulash. Goulash can come in many forms and varieties, depending on the origin of the recipe, but it is usually spicy and contains paprika and/or tomatoes. This tastes even better the day after it was made, it is stressfree and foolproof. I know the amount of wine may sound odd but the tannic acid in the wine makes the beef become incredibly tender. During cooking the sauce changes colour and the strong wine aroma will be mellow and delicious. Just like Boeuf Bourguignon but more rustic and spicy. I came up with this after I tried my roommates goulash. Smelled heavenly but the beef was stringy and tough.

Ingredients

Serves: 3 - 4

Metric Cups
  • 500 grams stewing beef (whole)
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 pepperoni sausage
  • 300 millilitres red wine
  • 400 millilitres beef stock
  • 50 grams smokey bacon
  • 2 tablespoons clarified butter
  • 1 red pepper
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 sprigs thyme
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 pinch of paprika (to taste)
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 pinch of pepper
  • 17⅔ ounces stewing beef (whole)
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 pepperoni sausage
  • 11 fluid ounce red wine
  • 14 fluid ounce beef broth
  • 1¾ ounces smokey bacon
  • 2 tablespoons clarified butter
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 sprigs thyme
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 pinch of paprika (to taste)
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 pinch of pepper

Method

Goulash Ala Bourguignon is a community recipe submitted by HannaBerlin and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • First wash and dry the beef. Then cut it into fairly large cubes, about 3 x 3 cm. I get 12 out of a pound of beef. The beef should be at room temperature before you start - as always.
  • Cut the bacon strips in two. Peel the onion and cut it into halve rings or rings, however you like it. Deseed (or not) and chop the peperoni, open your wine bottle. Use wine you'd like to drink, not the cheap stuff. It should be dry and not too fruity. Wrap the bay leaf or leaves around the thyme (you should use fresh or frozen bay leaf here, not the dried ones) and use butcher's string to make a neat little parcel. Peel the garlic.
  • Preheat your oven to 160°C.
  • Heat the clarified butter in a large heavy frying pan. Let the bacon drop into the fat (careful, it splashes) and swirl the pan around a bit so that the juices and flavours can mingle. Now drop one halve of the beef cubes in. Let them sit on one side for a few seconds until the don't stick to the pan anymore and quickly turn them. They don't have to brown on all sides, in fact they should be completely raw on the inside. Put the browned cubes in a casserole and do the second batch. When you are done with the beef, lower the heat and throw the onions into the fat. Let them fry for a minute or so and then put them in the casserole with the beef. Add the lovely juices from the pan and the bacon, if you like. Otherwise dispose of the bacon (preferably by eating it) and dust beef and onions with the flour, salt and pepper.
  • Put the casserole on medium heat and when you hear sizzling, pour the wine over. Add the herb parcel, beef stock, peperoni, garlic, tomato paste and bring to the boil. Put on the lid and transfer to the oven. It should stay in there for at least two and a halve hours, 3 would be best. I know it smells heavenly but it pays to be patient.
  • Chop the red pepper into fairly large pieces. Carefully pull the casserole out of the oven and put it on the stove. Fish out the herbs, the bacon (or not) and the garlic. Bring to the boil and add the red pepper. Stirr while it cooks. When the pepper is tender, add paprika and other spices of your choice to taste.
  • Serve with bread, rice, potatoes or pasta or eat cold straight from the pot in the middle of the night (my favourite). Freeze it, reheat it, it only gets better. You could make this as a Sunday lunch or serve it at a very informal dinner party.
  • First wash and dry the beef. Then cut it into fairly large cubes, about 3 x 3 cm. I get 12 out of a pound of beef. The beef should be at room temperature before you start - as always.
  • Cut the bacon strips in two. Peel the onion and cut it into halve rings or rings, however you like it. Deseed (or not) and chop the peperoni, open your wine bottle. Use wine you'd like to drink, not the cheap stuff. It should be dry and not too fruity. Wrap the bay leaf or leaves around the thyme (you should use fresh or frozen bay leaf here, not the dried ones) and use butcher's string to make a neat little parcel. Peel the garlic.
  • Preheat your oven to 160°C.
  • Heat the clarified butter in a large heavy frying pan. Let the bacon drop into the fat (careful, it splashes) and swirl the pan around a bit so that the juices and flavours can mingle. Now drop one halve of the beef cubes in. Let them sit on one side for a few seconds until the don't stick to the pan anymore and quickly turn them. They don't have to brown on all sides, in fact they should be completely raw on the inside. Put the browned cubes in a casserole and do the second batch. When you are done with the beef, lower the heat and throw the onions into the fat. Let them fry for a minute or so and then put them in the casserole with the beef. Add the lovely juices from the pan and the bacon, if you like. Otherwise dispose of the bacon (preferably by eating it) and dust beef and onions with the flour, salt and pepper.
  • Put the casserole on medium heat and when you hear sizzling, pour the wine over. Add the herb parcel, beef broth, peperoni, garlic, tomato paste and bring to the boil. Put on the lid and transfer to the oven. It should stay in there for at least two and a halve hours, 3 would be best. I know it smells heavenly but it pays to be patient.
  • Chop the red bell pepper into fairly large pieces. Carefully pull the casserole out of the oven and put it on the stove. Fish out the herbs, the bacon (or not) and the garlic. Bring to the boil and add the red bell pepper. Stirr while it cooks. When the pepper is tender, add paprika and other spices of your choice to taste.
  • Serve with bread, rice, potatoes or pasta or eat cold straight from the pot in the middle of the night (my favourite). Freeze it, reheat it, it only gets better. You could make this as a Sunday lunch or serve it at a very informal dinner party.
  • Tell us what you think