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Clementine & Limoncello Marmalade

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

This is a lovely marmalade where the sweetness of the clementines is tempered by the sharpness of the Limoncello

This is a lovely marmalade where the sweetness of the clementines is tempered by the sharpness of the Limoncello

Ingredients

Serves: 6

Metric Cups
  • 1 kilogram clementines
  • 750 grams granulated sugar
  • 250 millilitres limoncello
  • 2⅕ pounds clementines
  • 26 ounces granulated sugar
  • 8⅘ fluid ounce limoncello

Method

Clementine & Limoncello Marmalade is a community recipe submitted by LittleAlex and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • Peel the clementines and coarsely chop the fruit, discarding any seeds as you go. Thinly slice the peel into matchstick strips. Put the fruit and peel in a large pan with 1/2 litre of water and leave overnight. This step reduces the subsequent simmering time, but if you prefer you can omit it.
  • When ready, bring the clementines to simmering point and simmer for 1-2 hours until the peel is tender. To test the peel, remove a piece from the pan, let it cool, then rub it between your fingers; if it breaks easily and rubs away, it is ready. Stir in the sugar. Add the Limoncello. When the sugar has dissolved, increase the heat as high as possible and boil rapidly, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until set.
  • The time varies from around 10 to 25 or 30 minutes. To test for setting, put a plate in the fridge. Drop a tablespoon of the marmalade onto the cold plate and let it cool for a minute. Tip the plate or push the marmalade with your finger; if the surface wrinkles slightly, it is ready. Pour into sterilized jars.
  • Peel the clementines and coarsely chop the fruit, discarding any seeds as you go. Thinly slice the peel into matchstick strips. Put the fruit and peel in a large pan with 1/2 litre of water and leave overnight. This step reduces the subsequent simmering time, but if you prefer you can omit it.
  • When ready, bring the clementines to simmering point and simmer for 1-2 hours until the peel is tender. To test the peel, remove a piece from the pan, let it cool, then rub it between your fingers; if it breaks easily and rubs away, it is ready. Stir in the sugar. Add the Limoncello. When the sugar has dissolved, increase the heat as high as possible and boil rapidly, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until set.
  • The time varies from around 10 to 25 or 30 minutes. To test for setting, put a plate in the fridge. Drop a tablespoon of the marmalade onto the cold plate and let it cool for a minute. Tip the plate or push the marmalade with your finger; if the surface wrinkles slightly, it is ready. Pour into sterilized jars.
  • Additional Information

    To sterilize jars, boil them in a large pot of water or heat them in a 250-degree oven for 5 minutes.

    Makes 6 half-pint jars

    To sterilize jars, boil them in a large pot of water or heat them in a 250-degree oven for 5 minutes.

    Makes 6 half-pint jars

    Tell us what you think

    What 2 Others have said

    • Just finished making a batch of this using clementines and satsumas. Instead of the limoncello, I used the juice of oe lemon. Also used jam sugar to ensure the set, but no it should not be necessary with citrus. Anyway very easy to do and a great fresh taste - great way to use up extra Christmas fruit or to take advantage of the New Year special offers on tangerine-type fruits.

      Posted by JamesUk on 4th January 2014
    • This is a really brilliant recipe. I didn't actually add the limoncello, as I don't have any. However, the clementines on their own produce a marmalade with amazing citrus depth, as light bitterness, which I love, and a lingering sweetness. Have been eating this on toast every day since I made it.

      Posted by Kahryn on 13th December 2012
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