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Baba Ghannouj (Badenjan Mutabbal)

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

The term ˜ baba ghannouj, which literally translated means my father is spoiled like a child by my mother , is actually quite an inappropriate name, not to be uttered at a traditional Lebanese family gathering the father would be insulted and the mother and children shamed. The more honourable name badenjan mutabbal (aubergine dip) is of course an aubergine dip mixed with garlic and lemon juice. The key to the recipe lies in the roasting of the aubergine over a fire or barbeque grill for that traditional smoky flavour. The skins are blackened, then the sweet flesh within is used, being pured with a strong garlic and mild nutty tahina. Note; if the smoke flavour is too intense, add a heaped tablespoon of natural yoghurt to the dip to produce a milder version.

The term ˜ baba ghannouj, which literally translated means my father is spoiled like a child by my mother , is actually quite an inappropriate name, not to be uttered at a traditional Lebanese family gathering the father would be insulted and the mother and children shamed. The more honourable name badenjan mutabbal (aubergine dip) is of course an aubergine dip mixed with garlic and lemon juice. The key to the recipe lies in the roasting of the aubergine over a fire or barbeque grill for that traditional smoky flavour. The skins are blackened, then the sweet flesh within is used, being pured with a strong garlic and mild nutty tahina. Note; if the smoke flavour is too intense, add a heaped tablespoon of natural yoghurt to the dip to produce a milder version.

Ingredients

Serves: serves 4 people as a starter o

Metric Cups
  • 2 large aubergines
  • 4 tablespoons tahini
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt flakes
  • 1 tablespoon natural yoghurt
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley (to garnish)
  • 1 tomato (seeded, finely chopped, to garnish)
  • 1 splash of olive oil (to garnish)
  • 1 sprinkling of paprika (to garnish)
  • 2 large eggplants
  • 4 tablespoons tahini
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon natural yoghurt
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley (to garnish)
  • 1 tomato (seeded, finely chopped, to garnish)
  • 1 splash of olive oil (to garnish)
  • 1 sprinkling of paprika (to garnish)

Method

Baba Ghannouj (Badenjan Mutabbal) is a community recipe submitted by sprocketyboo and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • Cook the aubergine over charcoal, a camp fire, a barbecue plate or other open flame(basically anything that will give a good char-grill and that smoky flavour you are aiming for) until the skins are crackling and blackened and the flesh within is soft.
  • Set aside and allow to cool. Peel off the skin of the aubergines, removing all charred pieces.
  • Mash the flesh with a wooden spoon (traditional method) or blend to a pure using a food processor or hand-held blender and mixing bowl.
  • Crush the garlic, add with sea salt to the aubergines & continue to blend to a smooth pulp. Add the tahina and lemon juice and combine well until mixture is a smooth paste.
  • To serve, transfer to a serving dish and top the aubergine dip with chopped tomatoes, parsley, olive oil, a generous sprinkling of paprika and offer with freshly toasted Lebanese bread.
  • Cook the eggplant over charcoal, a camp fire, a barbecue plate or other open flame(basically anything that will give a good char-grill and that smoky flavour you are aiming for) until the skins are crackling and blackened and the flesh within is soft.
  • Set aside and allow to cool. Peel off the skin of the eggplants, removing all charred pieces.
  • Mash the flesh with a wooden spoon (traditional method) or blend to a pure using a food processor or hand-held blender and mixing bowl.
  • Crush the garlic, add with sea salt to the eggplants & continue to blend to a smooth pulp. Add the tahina and lemon juice and combine well until mixture is a smooth paste.
  • To serve, transfer to a serving dish and top the eggplant dip with chopped tomatoes, parsley, olive oil, a generous sprinkling of paprika and offer with freshly toasted Lebanese bread.
  • Additional Information

    When my partner and I travelled in Canada I made my living over the Summer in the Okanagan in a Pizzeria run by a Lebanese family, the mother ˜Yvette“ took me under her wing and I was most privileged to share a passion of food from her and get a more intimate understanding of Arabic cooking which to this day I am very fond of. This simple but tasty recipe reminds me of the kind of dishes we ate when Yvette put on a big Lebanese feast for my partner's birthday.

    When my partner and I travelled in Canada I made my living over the Summer in the Okanagan in a Pizzeria run by a Lebanese family, the mother ˜Yvette“ took me under her wing and I was most privileged to share a passion of food from her and get a more intimate understanding of Arabic cooking which to this day I am very fond of. This simple but tasty recipe reminds me of the kind of dishes we ate when Yvette put on a big Lebanese feast for my partner's birthday.

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    What 1 Other has said

    • This turned out nicely. I roasted the aubergine over some charcoal leftover from a kebab cookout, then set the aubergine pulp on a thick layer of paper towels for about 30 min to drain off excess moisture. I culled some of the seed clumps as I blame them for bitterness in past attempts. I used smoked paprika to garnish but skipped the diced tomato using some Aleppo pepper flakes instead. Very nice balance overall. Thanks!

      Posted by Toshiko Suisei on 27th August 2014
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