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Chocolate Goddess Cake

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

I was seduced by the name! This is from the pret-a-manger recipe book. Very rich, very delicious. I usually buy a slice of this cake whenever I pop into pret for a coffee. But now thankfully they have published the recipe so I can indulge in an entire cake!!!

I was seduced by the name! This is from the pret-a-manger recipe book. Very rich, very delicious. I usually buy a slice of this cake whenever I pop into pret for a coffee. But now thankfully they have published the recipe so I can indulge in an entire cake!!!

Ingredients

Serves: 8-10

Metric Cups

For the Cake

  • 3 medium eggs
  • 200 grams caster sugar
  • 100 millilitres vegetable oil
  • 100 millilitres water
  • 100 grams dark chocolate
  • 135 grams plain flour
  • 75 grams ground almonds
  • 55 grams unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

For the Icing

  • 30 millilitres boiling water
  • 30 grams unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 70 grams unsalted butter
  • 140 grams icing sugar

For the Cake

  • 3 medium eggs
  • 7 ounces superfine sugar
  • 3½ fluid ounce vegetable oil
  • 3½ fluid ounce water
  • 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate
  • 5 ounces all-purpose flour
  • 3 ounces almond meal
  • 2 ounces unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda

For the Icing

  • 1 fluid ounce boiling water
  • 1 ounce unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 ounces unsalted butter
  • 5 ounces confectioners' sugar

Method

Chocolate Goddess Cake is a community recipe submitted by tootsievalentine and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

To make the icing:

  • Mix the hot water with the cocoa powder to make a paste and allow to cool. - Beat the butter until pale and fluffy - this can be quite difficult with a relatively small quantity and you may need to start adding the icing sugar sooner to increase the bulk.
  • Keep adding the sugar, a spoonful at a time, beating between additions. - Add the cocoa paste and beat until it is well incorporated.
  • Put the icing to one side - not in the fridge or it will be too hard to spread neatly over the top of the cake.
  • To make the cake:

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180C (350F/Gas 4). - Line a 21cm baking tin with baking paper. - In a large bowl using an electric beater whisk the eggs at high speed until doubled in volume. Add the sugar and continue beating until pale and fluffy. With the whisk still on high speed, add the oil in a slow steady stream. Keep beating until the mixture holds the shape of any trail across the surface.
  • Pour the water delicately round the edge of the bowl and then the melted chocolate. Fold them both carefully into the mixture using a large metal spoon.
  • Sift the flour, almonds, baking powder and bicarb together over the cake mixture and fold in with smooth, light gestures. - Put the mixture gently into the prepared cake tin.
  • Bake for 65-75 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean when poked into the centre of the cake. - If the top of the cake seems to be browning too much before the centre is ready, simply balance a piece of baking paper or foil across the top of the tin and it will protect the cake from burning.
  • Leave the cake to cool for 10-15 minutes before turning it out onto a wire rack. - When it is completely cold, slice across horizontally and spread a third of the icing over the bottom half. - Replace the top and decorate with the remaining icing.
  • To make the icing:

  • Mix the hot water with the cocoa powder to make a paste and allow to cool. - Beat the butter until pale and fluffy - this can be quite difficult with a relatively small quantity and you may need to start adding the confectioners' sugar sooner to increase the bulk.
  • Keep adding the sugar, a spoonful at a time, beating between additions. - Add the cocoa paste and beat until it is well incorporated.
  • Put the icing to one side - not in the fridge or it will be too hard to spread neatly over the top of the cake.
  • To make the cake:

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180C (350F/Gas 4). - Line a 21cm baking tin with baking paper. - In a large bowl using an electric beater whisk the eggs at high speed until doubled in volume. Add the sugar and continue beating until pale and fluffy. With the whisk still on high speed, add the oil in a slow steady stream. Keep beating until the mixture holds the shape of any trail across the surface.
  • Pour the water delicately round the edge of the bowl and then the melted chocolate. Fold them both carefully into the mixture using a large metal spoon.
  • Sift the flour, almonds, baking powder and bicarb together over the cake mixture and fold in with smooth, light gestures. - Put the mixture gently into the prepared cake tin.
  • Bake for 65-75 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean when poked into the centre of the cake. - If the top of the cake seems to be browning too much before the centre is ready, simply balance a piece of baking paper or foil across the top of the tin and it will protect the cake from burning.
  • Leave the cake to cool for 10-15 minutes before turning it out onto a wire rack. - When it is completely cold, slice across horizontally and spread a third of the icing over the bottom half. - Replace the top and decorate with the remaining icing.
  • Additional Information

    All the pleas for gentleness are because, having worked hard to produce a light, fluffy, air-filled combination of ingredients, you do not want to whack the air out again by being rough. The air will be key in getting the cake to rise when the heat of the oven kicks in. No magic, a fundamental scientific principle of heat causing air to rise and if there is no air, the result is a leaden pellet of cooked ingredients sitting heavily at the bottom of the cake tin.

    All the pleas for gentleness are because, having worked hard to produce a light, fluffy, air-filled combination of ingredients, you do not want to whack the air out again by being rough. The air will be key in getting the cake to rise when the heat of the oven kicks in. No magic, a fundamental scientific principle of heat causing air to rise and if there is no air, the result is a leaden pellet of cooked ingredients sitting heavily at the bottom of the cake tin.

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