youtube pinterest twitter facebook instagram vimeo whatsapp Bookmark Entries BURGER NEW Chevron Down Chevron Left Chevron Right Basket Speech Comment Search Video Play Icon Premium Nigella Lawson Vegan Vegetarian Member Speech Recipe Email Bookmark Comment Camera Scales Quantity List Reorder Remove Open book
Menu Signed In
More Nigella recipes

Tomato and Fried Bread Hash

by . Featured in AT MY TABLE
Print me

Introduction

An excellent sop for excess alcohol, this is as good for a late supper as it is for breakfast. I like to have a bottle of Worcestershire sauce (already essential in the hash) on the table alongside, but no one would argue with you if you chose to shake a few drops of Tabasco over it while you eat.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

An excellent sop for excess alcohol, this is as good for a late supper as it is for breakfast. I like to have a bottle of Worcestershire sauce (already essential in the hash) on the table alongside, but no one would argue with you if you chose to shake a few drops of Tabasco over it while you eat.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

Image of Nigella's Tomato and Fried Bread Hash
Photo by Jonathan Lovekin

Ingredients

Serves: 2

Metric Cups
  • 100 millilitres regular olive oil
  • 2 - 3 thick slices bread (crusts removed and cut into cubes)
  • 1 (approx. 50g) banana shallot (peeled and cut into fine-ish half-moons)
  • 1 generous pinch of sea salt flakes
  • 1 fat clove garlic (peeled and minced)
  • 3 medium-large (approx. 350g) tomatoes (cut into chunks)
  • 2 teaspoons worcestershire sauce
  • a good grinding of black pepper
  • 2 x 15ml tablespoons finely chopped chives
  • 7 tablespoons regular olive oil
  • 2 - 3 thick slices bread (crusts removed and cut into cubes)
  • 1 banana shallot (peeled and cut into fine-ish half-moons)
  • 1 generous pinch of kosher salt
  • 1 fat clove garlic (peeled and minced)
  • 3 medium-large (approx. 12oz) tomatoes (cut into chunks)
  • 2 teaspoons worcestershire sauce
  • a good grinding of black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives

Method

  1. Line a plate with a couple of pieces of kitchen roll, and sit it near the hob. Heat the oil in a heavy-based wok or frying pan: you can test whether it's hot enough by dropping in one of the cubes of bread; if it makes the oil sizzle, you're ready to go. Equally, if the bread darkens straightaway, you'll need to take the wok off the heat for a bit to cool the oil down.
  2. Carefully tumble the cubes of bread into the hot oil and fry - stirring as needed to get them crisp on all sides - for a bare minute, or until you have gorgeously golden to golden-brown croutons. Transfer them to the paper-lined plate, then discard most of the oil, leaving about 2 tablespoonfuls in the wok.
  3. Turn the heat down, then add the shallot, sprinkle with salt and cook, stirring frequently, for around 5 minutes until softened and slightly caramelised around the edges, then stir in the minced garlic.
  4. Now turn the heat up, then add the tomatoes and cook, stirring, until the pulpy interior has collapsed a little and the skins have softened. Frankly, I'd be amazed if this took more than a couple of minutes.
  5. Add the Worcestershire sauce, grind in some pepper, generously, sprinkle in about half of the chopped chives and give a quick stir, before returning the crisp, cooked cubes of bread to the pan. Toss everything together in a sprightly fashion, then divide betwen two waiting plates. Sprinkle with the rest of the chives, and dive in.
  1. Line a plate with a couple of pieces of kitchen roll, and sit it near the hob. Heat the oil in a heavy-based wok or frying pan: you can test whether it's hot enough by dropping in one of the cubes of bread; if it makes the oil sizzle, you're ready to go. Equally, if the bread darkens straightaway, you'll need to take the wok off the heat for a bit to cool the oil down.
  2. Carefully tumble the cubes of bread into the hot oil and fry - stirring as needed to get them crisp on all sides - for a bare minute, or until you have gorgeously golden to golden-brown croutons. Transfer them to the paper-lined plate, then discard most of the oil, leaving about 2 tablespoonfuls in the wok.
  3. Turn the heat down, then add the shallot, sprinkle with salt and cook, stirring frequently, for around 5 minutes until softened and slightly caramelised around the edges, then stir in the minced garlic.
  4. Now turn the heat up, then add the tomatoes and cook, stirring, until the pulpy interior has collapsed a little and the skins have softened. Frankly, I'd be amazed if this took more than a couple of minutes.
  5. Add the Worcestershire sauce, grind in some pepper, generously, sprinkle in about half of the chopped chives and give a quick stir, before returning the crisp, cooked cubes of bread to the pan. Toss everything together in a sprightly fashion, then divide betwen two waiting plates. Sprinkle with the rest of the chives, and dive in.

Additional Information

MAKE AHEAD / STORE:
It is not advisable to make ahead/store.

MAKE AHEAD / STORE:
It is not advisable to make ahead/store.

Tell us what you think

What 4 Others have said

  • Made this in my 'curry' pan, which gives anything made in it a gentle heat, on account of the thousands of spicy meals made within. Delicious! Might have to make another batch....

    Posted by Hatagaya on 24th June 2022
  • Delicious way to use leftover bread.

    Posted by Bimbolica on 24th April 2021
  • My Air Force brat husband learned a similar version he calls Hot Lead. Instead of putting in bread, he fries up bacon chunks. The rest goes in as per recipe (Heavy on the tomatoes. Canned tomato chunks work in winter.). When it cooks down, he pours it over thick toast. Yum!

    Posted by Montymiff on 6th June 2020
  • Thank you for this wonderful recipe! I made this on Mother’s Day to celebrate my mom who loved a good fresh tomato from the garden! She would have loved this.

    Posted by Cookinggirl13 on 10th May 2020
Show more comments