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Butterscotch Pots

by . Featured in AT MY TABLE
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Introduction

When I was a child, my idea of a treat beyond measure was butterscotch Angel Delight, a chemical-tasting mousse in a packet, made by whisking milk into its tipped-out contents of flour, flavourings and God knows what else; my fondly remembered love of which says more about the romance of nostalgia than it does about the pudding itself. Still, inspiration comes in many forms, and this one has created a silky, richly smooth caramel custard pudding, with something childishly comforting about it.

When I was a child, my idea of a treat beyond measure was butterscotch Angel Delight, a chemical-tasting mousse in a packet, made by whisking milk into its tipped-out contents of flour, flavourings and God knows what else; my fondly remembered love of which says more about the romance of nostalgia than it does about the pudding itself. Still, inspiration comes in many forms, and this one has created a silky, richly smooth caramel custard pudding, with something childishly comforting about it.

Image of Nigella's Butterscotch Pots
Photo by Jonathan Lovekin

Ingredients

Serves: 2

Metric Cups
  • 4 teaspoons cornflour
  • 200 millilitres full fat milk
  • 1 large egg (yolk only)
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 15 grams soft unsalted butter
  • 50 grams caster sugar
  • 100 millilitres double cream
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 1 large egg (yolk only)
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon soft unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup superfine sugar
  • 7 tablespoons heavy cream

Method

You will need 2 x approx. 150ml / ⅔ cup ramekins or heatproof glasses.

  1. Put the cornflour into a bowl, then slowly whisk in the milk and keep whisking until you have banished every lump. Now beat in the egg yolk and salt, and set aside somewhere within easy reach of the hob.
  2. Melt the butter in a small, heavy-based saucepan, over a medium-high heat, and then whisk in the sugar. It will look grainy and clumpy at these early stages – rather like lemon sorbet – but keep whisking and it will become first a toffee-like goo, and then a smooth and placid butterscotch-coloured lake. Once it begins to bubble, swirl the pan frequently, until it becomes a rich, deep, glossy teak and begins to smoke. Don’t let it burn, obviously, but don’t be so timorous that you fail to get that smoky caramel taste.
  3. Take the pan off the heat and whisk in the cream, which will bubble up vociferously, so be careful, and keep whisking until it stops bubbling. Should there be any lumps at this stage, simply return the pan to a low heat and stir until dissolved.
  4. Pour half this hot mixture into the milk and egg and whisk to incorporate. When it’s smooth, pour the contents of the bowl back into the butterscotch pan, using a spatula to scrape every last bit in, put over a medium-high heat and whisk until it is gorgeously thick. This should take a minute or so.
  5. For ease, pour into a heatproof jug and thence into your serving glasses. The minute you’ve filled the glasses, press some cling film or dampened baking parchment directly on top of the butterscotch puddings to prevent a skin forming and leave to cool. You can eat these as soon as they’re cold. On serving, remove the cling film or baking parchment and swirl the tops with the back of a teaspoon. Should you feel like squirting a rosette of cream on top and grating some chocolate over it, why should I be the person to stop you?

You will need 2 x approx. 150ml / ⅔ cup ramekins or heatproof glasses.

  1. Put the cornstarch into a bowl, then slowly whisk in the milk and keep whisking until you have banished every lump. Now beat in the egg yolk and salt, and set aside somewhere within easy reach of the hob.
  2. Melt the butter in a small, heavy-based saucepan, over a medium-high heat, and then whisk in the sugar. It will look grainy and clumpy at these early stages – rather like lemon sorbet – but keep whisking and it will become first a toffee-like goo, and then a smooth and placid butterscotch-coloured lake. Once it begins to bubble, swirl the pan frequently, until it becomes a rich, deep, glossy teak and begins to smoke. Don’t let it burn, obviously, but don’t be so timorous that you fail to get that smoky caramel taste.
  3. Take the pan off the heat and whisk in the cream, which will bubble up vociferously, so be careful, and keep whisking until it stops bubbling. Should there be any lumps at this stage, simply return the pan to a low heat and stir until dissolved.
  4. Pour half this hot mixture into the milk and egg and whisk to incorporate. When it’s smooth, pour the contents of the bowl back into the butterscotch pan, using a spatula to scrape every last bit in, put over a medium-high heat and whisk until it is gorgeously thick. This should take a minute or so.
  5. For ease, pour into a heatproof jug and thence into your serving glasses. The minute you’ve filled the glasses, press some cling film or dampened baking parchment directly on top of the butterscotch puddings to prevent a skin forming and leave to cool. You can eat these as soon as they’re cold. On serving, remove the cling film or baking parchment and swirl the tops with the back of a teaspoon. Should you feel like squirting a rosette of cream on top and grating some chocolate over it, why should I be the person to stop you?

Tell us what you think

What 4 Others have said

  • Startlingly easy to make - almost quicker than reading the instructions! Not chilled yet, but the scrapings off the spatula were yummy.

    Posted by Guinevere1440 on 25th May 2019
  • My treat beyond measure is still butterscotch Angel Delight, I’m definitely going to try your recipe!

    Posted by Jennigee on 7th February 2019
  • This sounds really yummy, I myst try it soon.

    Posted by charc on 6th February 2019
  • This is delicious and so easy to make. I sprinkled some sea salt flakes over the top. Divine.

    Posted by Gemkate on 5th February 2019
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