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Jan's Clementine Cake

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

Another fixed item in my Christmas repertoire is my clementine cake. This is suitable for any number of reasons. First, it's made of the clementines which are seasonal. Then there's the fact that you need to cook them for 2 hours: you're more likely to be hanging around the house and to feel in the mood for this sort of thing during the Christmas period. It's incredibly easy to make; even if you're stressed out, it won't topple you over into nervous collapse. And, finally, it's such an accommodating kind of cake: it keeps well, indeed it gets better after a few days, and it is perfect either as a pudding, with some crème fraiche, or as cake to be eaten with seasonally sociable visitors in the mid-morning or afternoon. What more do you want? It was only after I did this a few times - the route it took to get to me was circuitous, as these things can be - that I realised it was more or less Claudia Roden's orange and almond cake. It is a wonderfully damp, dense and aromatic flourless cake: it tastes like one of those sponges you drench, while cooling, with syrup, only you don't have to. This is the easiest cake I know. View with US measurements From How To Eat - [l45]

Another fixed item in my Christmas repertoire is my clementine cake. This is suitable for any number of reasons. First, it's made of the clementines which are seasonal. Then there's the fact that you need to cook them for 2 hours: you're more likely to be hanging around the house and to feel in the mood for this sort of thing during the Christmas period. It's incredibly easy to make; even if you're stressed out, it won't topple you over into nervous collapse. And, finally, it's such an accommodating kind of cake: it keeps well, indeed it gets better after a few days, and it is perfect either as a pudding, with some crème fraiche, or as cake to be eaten with seasonally sociable visitors in the mid-morning or afternoon. What more do you want? It was only after I did this a few times - the route it took to get to me was circuitous, as these things can be - that I realised it was more or less Claudia Roden's orange and almond cake. It is a wonderfully damp, dense and aromatic flourless cake: it tastes like one of those sponges you drench, while cooling, with syrup, only you don't have to. This is the easiest cake I know. View with US measurements From How To Eat - [l45]

Ingredients

Serves: 1 CAKE

Metric Cups
  • 5 clementines
  • 6 eggs
  • 225 grams sugar
  • 250 grams ground almonds
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 5 clementines
  • 6 eggs
  • 7⅞ ounces sugar
  • 8⅚ ounces almond meal
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

Method

Jan's Clementine Cake is a community recipe submitted by Jan and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • Put the clementines in a pan with some cold water, bring to the boil and cook for 2 hours. Drain and, when cool, cut each clementine in half and remove the pips.
  • Dump the clementines - skins, pith, fruit and all - and give a quick blitz. Then tip in all the remaining ingredients and pulse to a pulp.
  • Preheat the oven to gas mark 5/190ºC. Butter and line a 21cm Springform tin.
  • Pour the cake mixture into the prepared tin and bake for an hour, when a skewer will come out clean; you'll probably have to cover with foil or greaseproof after about 40 minutes to stop the top burning. Remove from the oven and leave to cool, on a rack, but in the tin.
  • When the cake's cold, you can take it out of the tin. I think this is better a day after it's made, but I don't complain about eating it any time. I've also made this with an equal weight of oranges, and with lemons, in which case I increase the sugar to 250g and slightly anglicise it, too, by adding a glaze made of icing sugar mixed to a paste with lemon juice and a little water.
  • Put the clementines in a pan with some cold water, bring to the boil and cook for 2 hours. Drain and, when cool, cut each clementine in half and remove the pips.
  • Dump the clementines - skins, pith, fruit and all - and give a quick blitz. Then tip in all the remaining ingredients and pulse to a pulp.
  • Preheat the oven to gas mark 5/190ºC. Butter and line a 21cm Springform tin.
  • Pour the cake mixture into the prepared tin and bake for an hour, when a skewer will come out clean; you'll probably have to cover with foil or greaseproof after about 40 minutes to stop the top burning. Remove from the oven and leave to cool, on a rack, but in the tin.
  • When the cake's cold, you can take it out of the tin. I think this is better a day after it's made, but I don't complain about eating it any time. I've also made this with an equal weight of oranges, and with lemons, in which case I increase the sugar to 250g and slightly anglicise it, too, by adding a glaze made of icing sugar mixed to a paste with lemon juice and a little water.
  • Tell us what you think