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Gujarati Corn With Cream

A community recipe by

Not tested or verified by Nigella.com

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Introduction

Here is something to add to the Eid Curry Banquet from Feast. I'm not sure if "corn with cream" is quite the best or most seductive way to describe this dish though, since the 125ml worth of it stirred into kernels culled from 4 cobs reduces such a lot. But it is the best I can do; "spiced corn" and "Gujarati corn" simply didn't cut it. And this probably isn't exactly what you'll ever eat in Gujarat (Western India), but it falls in great proximity to a corn dish in Madhur Jaffrey's Food of India cookbook. Several words concerning the list of ingredients,which I know looks lengthy, but don't be appalled (or try not to be); they're all widely-available ingredients. This is best done with fresh, raw corn on a cob (sorry). The molasses sugar just adds an appropriate touch of sweetness that counters the heady spices perfectly. Feel free to omit, if you want. Lastly: you may use ready-ground spices, though I strongly recommend going the whole hog if it's a feast you are preparing.

Here is something to add to the Eid Curry Banquet from Feast. I'm not sure if "corn with cream" is quite the best or most seductive way to describe this dish though, since the 125ml worth of it stirred into kernels culled from 4 cobs reduces such a lot. But it is the best I can do; "spiced corn" and "Gujarati corn" simply didn't cut it. And this probably isn't exactly what you'll ever eat in Gujarat (Western India), but it falls in great proximity to a corn dish in Madhur Jaffrey's Food of India cookbook. Several words concerning the list of ingredients,which I know looks lengthy, but don't be appalled (or try not to be); they're all widely-available ingredients. This is best done with fresh, raw corn on a cob (sorry). The molasses sugar just adds an appropriate touch of sweetness that counters the heady spices perfectly. Feel free to omit, if you want. Lastly: you may use ready-ground spices, though I strongly recommend going the whole hog if it's a feast you are preparing.

Ingredients

Serves: 8

Metric Cups
  • 4 sweetcorn cobs
  • 1 onion (peeled and chopped)
  • 2 red chillies (seeded and finely chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon treacle
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 30 grams unsalted butter
  • 125 millilitres double cream (or single or evaporated milk)
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander
  • 4 sweetcorn cobs
  • 1 onion (peeled and chopped)
  • 2 red chiles (seeded and finely chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon molasses
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 ounces unsalted butter
  • 4 fluid ounce heavy cream (or single or evaporated milk)
  • 1 bunch cilantro

Method

Gujarati Corn With Cream is a community recipe submitted by noisette and has not been tested by Nigella.com so we are not able to answer questions regarding this recipe.

  • Cook the corn on the cob by anyway you fancy. I recommend steaming or boiling. Grilling is just too great a hassle, if you ask me. Whatever you do, do not overcook the corn or they'll just turn to mush (comforting as it sounds, it isn't what you're going for here) Allow to cool before lopping off the kernels with a sharp knife, or plucking them off my head. This shouldn't take very long, 8 - 10 minutes tops.
  • Toast the cumin, fennel and coriander seeds in the saucepan you intend to use to cook the corn in. Once earthily redolent, tip into a mortar and crush finely - but not too much.
  • Add the vegetable oil and saute the onion and chilli bits until they grow translucent, browning at the edges. This is when you add a good smattering of sea salt.
  • Tip in the aromatic ground spices and the turmeric and cook for a further minute on a low heat to infuse the mush of vegetables. Tip in the corn at this stage and add the cream/evaporated milk, followed by the knob of treacle sugar. Bang on the lid and cook for 7 - 10 minutes on the lowest possible flame before tasting.
  • Meanwhile, finally chop your coriander. Once it comes off the heat, sprinkle half the coriander and drop in the butter.
  • Cover with the lid until you are ready to serve, and when you are, simply tip the corn onto the serving dish - I use a wide shallow plate since the cream reduces to a sort of golden ointment - and fling over the remaining chopped coriander. That's it.
  • Cook the corn on the cob by anyway you fancy. I recommend steaming or boiling. Grilling is just too great a hassle, if you ask me. Whatever you do, do not overcook the corn or they'll just turn to mush (comforting as it sounds, it isn't what you're going for here) Allow to cool before lopping off the kernels with a sharp knife, or plucking them off my head. This shouldn't take very long, 8 - 10 minutes tops.
  • Toast the cumin, fennel and coriander seeds in the saucepan you intend to use to cook the corn in. Once earthily redolent, tip into a mortar and crush finely - but not too much.
  • Add the vegetable oil and saute the onion and chilli bits until they grow translucent, browning at the edges. This is when you add a good smattering of sea salt.
  • Tip in the aromatic ground spices and the turmeric and cook for a further minute on a low heat to infuse the mush of vegetables. Tip in the corn at this stage and add the cream/evaporated milk, followed by the knob of molasses sugar. Bang on the lid and cook for 7 - 10 minutes on the lowest possible flame before tasting.
  • Meanwhile, finally chop your coriander. Once it comes off the heat, sprinkle half the coriander and drop in the butter.
  • Cover with the lid until you are ready to serve, and when you are, simply tip the corn onto the serving dish - I use a wide shallow plate since the cream reduces to a sort of golden ointment - and fling over the remaining chopped coriander. That's it.
  • Additional Information

    Believe it or not: For a feast, this can stretch to serve up to 8.

    Believe it or not: For a feast, this can stretch to serve up to 8.

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